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Américains capturés et intégrés à la société de la Nouvelle-France

Je copie ici des textes qui sont ou ont été publiés sur Internet sur les habitants des 13 colonies (Américains) capturés et intégrés à la société de la Nouvelle-France. Certain de ces textes ont depuis été enlevés sur leur site d'origine.

Josiah Ignace Rising dit Raizenne #6983 et Abigail Élizabeth Nims dit Nimbs #6984
Copie du site de Jennifer Sneirson's Relatives and Ancestors le 15 janvier 2011
From web url: http://ftp.cosmos.org/HTML/d0003/g0000095.htm#l15946:

He was buried in the Chapel de Rois at L'Annonciation Church, Oka, Quebec, Canada. He was baptized December 23, 1706 as Ignace Raisin (sic), brought from the English, aged about twelve years. Godfather was Ignace Kanatagariasse by M. Quere Priest. At the end of Queen Anne's War under the Treaty of Utrecht, Stoddard and Williams were sent to Canada to redeem the captives. Abigail's brother, John, went as the head of the Nims family. It is reported that Abigail or Elizabeth refused to return to Massachusetts stating she would rather be "only a prisoner among Catholics, than a rich heiress in a protestant family." Josiah Rising or Ignace Raizenne also refused to return, it is believe because he feared exposing his Catholic faith to heretic people. Because of this priests of St. Sulpice bought the liberty of these two captives. They were married in the mission chapel at Sault-au-Recollet on July 29, 1715 as the record below indicates:

"July 29 1715 I have married Ignace Shoetak8anni and Elizabeth T8atog8ach, (sic) both English, who wish to remain with the Christian Indians, not only renouncing their nation, but even wishing to live "en savages", in presence of Jean-Baptiste Haronhiatek, Gabriel Tsirok8as, Pierre Asonthen, Alexis tarhi and others. Ignace Shoetak8anni aged about 23 or 24 years and Elizabeth about 15 years. Both were taken at Dierfile (sic), about 13 years ago. M. Quere, priest S.S."

When the mission for the Indians at Sault-Au-Recollet was transferred to the Lake of Tow Mountains (Lac de Deux Montagnes) in 1721, the priests of St. Sulpice granted Abigail/Elizabeth and Josiah/Ignace Raizenne 280 acres to join them in the area. Ignace was a farmer there at Oka, Quebec, canada.


Notes for Abigail dit Touatogouach Nims:
Birth: Baptized Marie Elisabeth.
Christening: "She who withdraws from water"

The following information was found from the web address:
http://ftp.cosmos.org/HTML/d0003/g0000094.html#l15945
^ that's a lowercase "L"

She was the youngest daughter of Godfrey Nims and his second wife, Mahitable Smead Hull, widow of Jeremiah Hull. She was captured during the Deerfield massacre of 1704 and carried to Canada. She married at Sault-au-Recollet, Quebec, another captive, Josiah Rising on July 19/29, 1715/6. Josiah Rising was born February 2, 1694 at Suffield, CT, and died Dec. 30, 1771 at Lake Two Mountains, Quebec, Canada. He was buried in the Chapel de Rois at l'annonciation Church, Oka, Quebec, Canada. Both Abigail and Josiah were captured and carried to Canada after the Deerfield Massacre of February 29, 1704. Abigail was taken with her mother, half-brother Ebenezor, step-sister, Elizabeth Hull and her brother-in-law, Philip Mattoon to Canada on a forced march. Her mother and Philip Mattoon died along the way. Josiah Rising was staying with his father's cousin, Mehuman Hinsdale, at the time of the massacre and was captured as well. The squaw, Ganastarsi, probably the wife or motehr of Abigail's captor, took in Abigail on her arrival at the fort at Sault-au-Recollet. She was given the name Towatogawach, meaning "she withdraws from the water." Josiah was taken by his captor, Macqua. He was given the name Shoetakwanni, meaning "he was taken away from his village." Both were baptized in the Roman Catholic religion by missionaries at Sault-au-Recollet shortly after their arrival. The following is a transcript of the French record of baptism of Abigail Nims:

"On the 15th day of June in the year 1704, the rites of baptism have been administered by me, the undersigned, to a little English girl named in her country, Abigail, and now Mary Elizabeth, born at Deerfield in New England the 31st of May of the year 1700, of the marriage of Geoffrey NIMBS (sic), cordwainer, and Meetable Smeed (sic), also deceased. Signed Marie Elizabeth Longeuil Meriel, priest."
 
 
Source: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/n/e/Jennifer-M-Sneirson/GENE13-0029.html    15 janvier 2011

 

John Hanson ou Ennson #6965 et Elisabeth Meadar ou Midar #6966
Copie du site de Jennifer Sneirson's Relatives and Ancestors
Notes for Elizabeth Meader:
An Account of the Captivity of Elizabeth Hanson, Now or Late of Kachecky, in New-England: Who, with Four of her Children and Servant-Maid, was taken captive by the Indians, and carried into Canada. Taken in Substance from her own Mouth, by Samuel Brownas.
Elizabeth Hanson was taken captive with her four children and a maidservant at Kachecky, in Dover township, on August 27, 1724. She was redeemed by her husband, John Hanson, the following year after five months' captivity among the Indians and one month with the French. Three of Mrs. Hanson's children and the maid were ransomed with her, but the eldest daughter (Sara Enneson) was not given up and later married a Frenchman (Sabourin). She was taken by the Indians from Maine or Eastern Canada, and carried to Port Royal, where her husband found her.
On the 27th of the Sixth Month, called August (England and the American colonies adopted the New Style calendar in March 1752, consequently August was considered the 6th month) 1725, my husband and all our men-servants being abroad, eleven Indians, armed with tomahawks and guns, who had some time before been skulking about the fields, and watching an opportunity of our means absence, came furiously into the house. No sooner were they entered, than they murdered one of my children upon the spot; intending no doubt, by this act of cruelty, to strike the greater degree of terror into the minds of us who survived. After they had thus done, their captain came towards me, with all the appearance of rage and fury it is possible to imagine: nevertheless, upon my earnest request for quarter, I prevailed with him to grant it.
I had with me a servant-maid and six children; but two of my little-ones were at that time playing in the orchard. My youngest child was but fourteen days old; and myself, of consequence, in a poor weak condition, and very unfit to endure the hardships I afterwards met with, as by the sequel will appear.
The next step they took was to rifle the house; which they did with much hurry and precipitation; being apprehensive in all probability of a surprise. And as it was late in the afternoon, they pack'd up what linen, woollen, and other things they liked, and forthwith turned us out of the house.
Being now at the door, my two children who had been playing in the orchard (the one six, the other four years of age) came in sight; and being terrified at the appearance of the naked Indians, they cried aloud. On which one of the Indians ran up to them; and taking one under each arm, brought them to us. My maid prevailed with the biggest to be still; but the other would not be pacified by any means, but continued shrieking and crying very much. Wherefore, to ease themselves of the noise, and prevent the danger of a discovery that might arise from it, they made no more to do, but knock'd out its brains before my face.
I bore this as well as the nature of so mournful a circumstance would permit; not daring to discover much of my uneasiness, lest it should provoke them to commit the like outrage upon the rest: but could have been glad they had kept out of sight till we had been gone from the house.
The Indians having now killed two of my children, the next thing they did was to scalp them; a practice common with them whenever they kill any English people. This they do by cutting off the skin from the crown of the head; which they take with them as evidence of the number they have slain, receiving sometimes a reward for every scalp.
This being done, they prepared to leave the house in great haste, without committing any other violence than taking what they had packed up, toghether with myself and little babe fourteen days old, my little boy of six years, one daughter about sixteen, and another about fourteen, and my maid-servant.
It was now, as I said before, but fourteen days since my lying-in; and being very tender and weakly, and turned out from a warm room, with every thing suitable to my circumstances, it increased the severity of the hardships I underwent exceedingly. Nevertheless I found the case was such, that I must either go or die; for I could make no resistance, neither would any persuasions avail.
Accordingly we began our journey, each having some of the plunder to carry, and I my infant: the other three were able to travel alone. But my new master, the Indian captain, was sometimes humane enough to carry my babe in his arms; which I looked upon as a singular favour, because he had besides a very heavy burden, and considerably more than he could take up without the help of his men.
We passed through several swamps and brooks; carefully avoiding all beaten paths, and every track that looked like a road, lest we should be surprised by our footsteps.
We travelled that night I suppose near ten miles in a direct line, and then we halted. The Indians kindled a fire, and we took up our quarters by it. They took it in turn to rest themselves, while a party of them kept watch, in order to prevent a surprise. For my part, I was very wet, as well as weary; and having no other lodging but the cold ground in the open woods, could get but little rest. Nevertheless, when day-light appeared, we set forward again, and travelled very hard all that day, passing through several swamps, rivers, and brooks, and still avoiding all beaten paths, for the reason already mentioned.
When night came on, I found myself again very wet, and heartily tired, having the same lodging, the cold ground and open woods. Thus did we travel for twenty-six days successively, and in general very hard; though sometimes we were helped a little by water, over lakes and ponds. We climbed up abundance of high mountains; some of which were so steep, that I was fain to crawl up them on my hands and knees: But when I was under these difficulties, my Indian master would for the most part carry my infant: and this I esteemed as a favour from the Almighty, in that his heart was so tenderly inclined to assist me. Nay, he would sometimes take my very blanket; so that, having no incumbrance, I was enabled to give some assistance to my little boy, and now-and-then carry him in my arms.
When we came to any difficult place, my master would lend me his hand: or if it were steep, he frequently used to push me up before him. In all which he discovered more civility and humanity than I could have expected; and for which I was thankful to God, as the moving cause.
We had now some very great runs of water and brooks to pass; in wading through which we sometimes met with great difficulty, being frequently up to our middles, and some of the children to their shoulders and chins. But the Indians carried my babe (that is, my little boy) through them on their shoulders.
At the side of one of these rivers, the Indians would have had my eldest daughter (Sara Enneson) sing them a song. Whereupon a passage in the cxxxvii Psalm was brought to her remembrance; to wit, By the rivers of Babylon there we sat down. Yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps on the willows in the midst thereof. For they that carried us away captive, required of us a song; and they that wasted us, required of us mirth.
When my poor child had given me this account, it affected me greatly, and my heart was filled with sorrow. Yet on her account I rejoiced that she had so good an inclination; which she still further manifested, by wishing for a Bible, that we might have the comfort of reading the Holy Text at leisure times, for our spiritual consolation under the afflictions we then suffered.
Next to the difficulty of crossing the rivers, were the prodigious swamps and thickets, which were very hard to pass through. But here also my master would sometimes lend me his hand; and as they passed through quickly one after the other, it became pretty tollerable for the hindmost. But the greatest difficulty of all, and which deserves to be named, was out want of proper sustenance: for we were now reduced to very great extremity: having often nothing to eat but pieces of old beaver-skin match-coats (mantles or loose coverings of fur worn by New England Indians), which the Indians, in their journey to our settlement, had concealed (for they came naked to us naked, as I said before), but now, in their return, took along with them. They were used more for food than raiment, but cut out in long narrow straps, of which they gave us some little pieces. These, after their example, we laid upon the fire till the furr was sindged off, and then ate them as dainty morsels, experimentally knowing, that to the hungry every bitter thing is sweet.
Of this diet, mean as it was, we had but a scanty allowance. And what still further increased my affliction, was the complaints and moans of my poor children. Sometimes indeed the Indians caught a squirrel, or a beaver; at others, we met with buts, berries, and roots; and sometimes we ate the bark of tress; but had no corn for a long while; till a party of the younger Indians went back and brought some from the English inhabitants, of which they gave us a very short allowance. But when they had killed a beaver, we lived high while it lasted; as their custom was to allow me the guts and garbage for myself and children; but they would by no means suffer us to wash and cleanse them; which occasioned this kind of diet to be very loathsome; and indeed nothing but pining hunger would have made it in the least degee tolerable.
My distresses did not all center here. I had yet another afflication no less severe than the former; and this is was. By daily travel and hard living, my milk was almost dried up; and how to preserve my poor babe's life, was a matter of no little concern to me; having many times no other sustenance for it than cold water; which I took into my mouth, and dropped it on my breast for it to suck in when I gave it the teat, with what little milk it could draw from thence. At other times, when I could procure any broth of beaver's guts, I fed it with that: by which means, and keeping it as warm as I could, its life was preserved till I came to Canada, where I met with better food.
When we were pretty far advanced in our journey, the Indians divided; and, to our great sorrow, divided us amongst them. My eldest daughter was taken away first, and carried to another part of the country, far distant from us. And we had not travelled far before they parted again, and took from me my second daughter and my servant-maid; so that I had now only the babe at my breast and my little boy of six years old. We three remained with the captain; but my daughter and servant underwent very great sufferings after they were taken from us; travelling very hard for three days together, without any sustenance but cold water; and on the third day the servant fell down in a swoon as dead; at which the Indians seemed surprised, and began to show some signs of tenderness; not being willing to lose any of their captives by death, after they had brought them so near their own home; hoping, no doubt in case they lived, to obtain a considerable price for their ransom. Accordingly, in a few days after this, they drew near their journey's end, where they found greater plenty of corn and other food; but flesh often fell very short, as they had no other way of procuring it but hunting.
It was not long before my daughter and servant were parted also; and my daughter's master falling sick, he was thereon disabled from hunting. All their corn was likewise spent; and so great were their distresses, that they were compelled to feed on the bark of trees for a whole week, being almost famished to death.
In this sore extremity it was providentially ordered, that some other Indians, hearing of their misery, came to visit them (for they are very kind and helpful one to another) and brought with them the guts and liver of a beaver; which, as they were but four in number (viz. the Indian and his wife and daughter, and my daughter) afforded them a good repast.
By this time my master and our company got to their journey's end; where we met with better entertainment, having corn, venison, wild fowl, and whatever else the Indians took in hunting. But my master's family being fifteen in number, it sometimes occasioned us to have very short commons, especially when game was scarce.
Our lodging was still on the cold ground, in a poor little wigwam, which is a kind of small shelter, made with the rinds of trees and matts for its covering, after the manner of a tent. These are so easily set up and taken down, that they often remove them from place to place. Our shoes, stockings, and other clothes being worn out in this long journey through bushes and swamps, and the season coming on very sharp and cold, we were poorly defended from the injuries of the weather; which now grew to severe, that one of my own feet, one of my babe's, and both my little boy's, were frozen with the cold. But although this brought no small exercise upon me, yet through mercy we all did well.
Notwithstanding we were now come to the end of our journey, the Indians abode not long in one place; but often removed from one spot to another, carrying their wigwams, which were not a little troublesome, whithersoever they went. These frequent removals were made for the sake of hunting; but were attended with great inconveniences, by reason of the dampness of the ground whereon th wigwams were pitched; which rendered our lodging much more unpleasant and unwholesome than if we had continued in one place.
At length we arrived at the Indian fort, where many of the people came to visit my master and his family, and congratulate him on his safe return, and the success of his expedition. Publick rejoicings were made upon it (which in their way perhaps were a kind of thanksgiving); and these were attended with dancing, firing of guns, beating on hollow trees instead of drums, shouting, drinking, and feasting for several days together with much excess.
But while the Indians were in their mirth and jollity, my mind was earnestly exercised towards the Lord, that I, with my dear children, who were now separated from me, might be preserved from repining against God under our present affliction. But that, on the other hand, we might have our dependence upon him, who rules in the hearts of men, and can do what he pleases in the kingdoms of the earth; knowing that his care is over those who put their trust in him. But I found it very difficult to keep my mind under that patient resignation, so necessary to be found in such sore trials and allictions as then fell to my lot: Being under various fears and doubts concerning my daughters, who were separated from me, which greatly increased my troubles: so that I can say my afflictions were not to be set forth by words to the full extent of them.
We had not long been arrived, before my master went abroad to hunt for provisions for the family, and was absent about a week. Before he set out, he ordered me to procure wood, and gather nuts: in doing which I was very diligent, during the time of his absence, cutting the wood, and putting it up in order. But no sooner was he returned, than I quickly perceived he was very much displeased; for he had net with no success in his hunting expedition; and so strongly did his disappointment work upon him, that he began to revenge it on us his captives. He allowed me, however, a little boiled corn for myself and child; but looking upon us with a very angry contenance, he threw a stick at me with so much violence, as plainly demonstrated that he grudged us the food we had received from him.
Hereupon his squaw and daughter broke forth in a violent fit of crying; which occasioned me to fear that some mischief was intended against us; and in consequence of this I instantly withdrew from his presence into another wigwam. He soon followed me; and in great fury tore my blanket from my back; then taking my little boy from me, he knocked him down as he went along before him. But the poor child, not being hurt, but only frightened with the fall, started up, and ran away without crying.
My Master then left us; but his wife's mother came and sat down by me, telling me I must sleep there that night. After this she went out for a while, and then returned with a small skin to cover my feet; giving me to understand withal, that my master was now determined to kill us.
I was very desirous to know the cause of this determination; urging to her that I had been diligent, during his absence, to do as he had ordered me; and in the best manner I was able endeavoured to make her sensible how unreasonable he was; although we had no other means of making ourselves intelligible to each other but by signs. She still continued to make signs to me that I must die; advising me (by pointing upwards) to pray to God; and endeavouring, by other signs, and tears intermixed, to instruct me in that which was most needful, to prepare for death, which now appeared to be nigh at hand from my bloody master; who had conceived evil against me without any just cause; but his ill success in hunting, and the scarcity of provisions, had made him quite outrageous.
The poor old squaw, his mother-in-law, was very kind and tender to me; and all that night would not leave me; but came and laid herself down at my feet, signifying her intention to use her endeavours to appease his wrath. For my own part, I got but little rest that night; though my babe slept sweetly by my side: but I dreaded the tragical design of my master, and looked every hour when he would enter the wigwam to execute his bloody purpose. But here again providence interposed. For being weary with hunting, and having toiled in the woods without success, he went to rest, and forgot to put in practice the horrid purpose he had formed.
The morning being come, he went forth again to hunt. I dreaded his return emptyhanded; and prayed in my heart that he might take something to satisfy his hunger, and quell his ill humour. And before he had been long gone, he returned with booty; having shot some wild ducks. He now appeared in a better temper, and ordered the fowls to be dressed speedily. For these Indians, whenever they are in possession of plenty, spent it as freely as they take it: often consuming in the space of two days, through gluttony and drunkenness, as much as with prudent management might serve a week. And thus they live, for the most part, either in riot and excess; or undergo very great hardships for want of necessaries.
As this was a time of plenty, I felt the comfort of it, together with the rest of the family; having a part sent to me and my children; which was very acceptable. I was now ready to think the bitterness of death was past for this time, and my spirit grew a little easier; yet this lasted not long before my master threatened my life again. But of this I took notice, that whenever this ill temper predominated, he was always pinched with hunger; and that when success attended his hunting, he was much better-humoured; though indeed he was naturally hot and passionate, and often threw sticks and stones at me, or whatever else may in his way, by reason whereof my life was continually in danger; but that God whose providence is over all his works, so preserved me, that I never received any great damage from this Indian; for which mercy I ever desire to be thankful to my Creator.
When flesh was scarse, we were only allowed the guts and garbage; but were not permitted to cleanse them any other way than just by emptying the dung out of them, and afterwards boiling them together with the broth of fowls; which would have been extremely nauseous, had not hunger compelled us to eat; but in time this kind of food, which often fell to our lot, became pretty tolerable to a keen appetite; though at another time I could by no means have dispensed with it. And this led me to consider that none are able to say what hardships they can suffer till the trial comes upon them. For that which in time past I had thought not fit for food in my own family, I should now have esteemed a sweet morsel, and a dainty dish.
By this time I was reduced so low, through fatigue of spirits, hard labour, mean diet, and the frequent want of natural rest, that my milk had entirely dried up again, and my helpless babe very poor and weak, appearing to be little more than skin and bones; for I could perceive every joint of it, from one end of its back to the other; and how to procure any thing that might suit its weak appetite, I was at a very great loss. Whereupon one of the Indian squaws, perceiving my uneasiness, began some discourse with me, and withal advised me to take up the kernels of walnuts, and after I had cleansed them, to beat them up with a little water; which accordingly I did, and the water looked like milk. Then she bid me add to this water a little of the finest Indian corn meal, and just boil it up together. I did so; and found it very palatable, and soon perceived that it nourished my babe, for it quickly began to thrive and look well; which gave me great comfort. I afterwards understood, that with this kind of diet the Indian children were often fed.
But the comfort I received on my dear child's recovery from the brink of death, was soon mixed with bitterness and trouble. For my master observing its thriving condition, used often to look upon it, and say, that when it was fat enough, he'd have it killed and eaten. Pursuant to this threat, he obliged me to fetch a stick, which he said he had prepared to roast my babe upon. And as soon as I had brought it, he made me sit down by him, and undress the infant. The child now being naked, he began to feel its arms, legs, and thighs; and having passed this examination upon it, he informed me, that as it was not yet fat enough, I must dress it again, till it was in better case. But notwithstanding he thus acted, I could not persuade myself he was in earnest, but that he did it with a view to afflict and aggravate me: neither could I think but that our lives would be preserved from his barbarous hands, by the overruling power of Him, in whose Providence I put my trust both night and day.
A little while after this, my master fell sick; and during his illness, as he lay in his wigwam, he ordered his own son to beat mine. But the old Squaw, the Indian boy's grandmother, would not suffer him to do it. Whereupon the father was so much provoked, that he seized hold on a stick, very sharp at one end, and threw it at my little boy with such violence, that it struck him so severe a blow on the breast, as made his countenance change as pale as death, through pain. I intreated him not to cry; and though he was but six years old, and his breast very much bruised, he bore it with wonderful patience, not so much as once complaining. So that the patience of the child restrained his barbarity; which it is hardly to be doubted would have transported him further in his resentment, had he cried; for complaining always aggravated his passion greatly, and his anger grew hotter upon it.
A short time after on the same day, he got upon his feet; but was much out of order. But notwithstanding he was sick, his wife and daughter let me know that he still purposed to kill us; which made me now very fearful, unless Providence interposed, in what manner it would end. I therefore laid down my child; and going out of his presence, went to cut wood for the fire, as I used to do, hoping this would in part abate his passion; but still I feared that before I returned to the wigwam, my two children would be killed.
In this situation I had no way left but to cast my care upon God, who had hitherto helped and protected me and mine. But while my master remained in this feud, the old squaw (his mother-in-law) left him; but my mistress and her daughter still remained with him in the wigwam.
As soon as I returned with my wood, the daughter came to me. I asked her if her father had killed my children? She answered me by a sign that he had not; and seemed to be pleased that he had forborn it. For instead of venting his fury on me and mine, the Lord, in whom I had put my trust, interposed in the needful time, and mercifully delivered us from the cruel purpose he had threatened to put in execution. Nor was he himself without some sense of the same, and that the hand of God was concerned therein, as he afterwards confessed to those who were about him. For a little time after he had got upon his feet he was struck with violent pains, and such a grievous sickness, that he uttered his complaints in a very doleful and hideous manner. Which when I understood (not having yet seen him) I went to another squaw, who was come to visit him, and could speak English, and asked her if my mistress (for so I used to call the Indian's wife) thought my master would die? She answered, it was very likely he would; for he grew worse and worse. I then told her he had struck my little boy a dreadful blow, without any provocation; and had threatened, in his fury, to kill us all. The squaw confessed that the abuse he offered to my child, and the mischief he had done him, was the cause why God afflicted him with that sickness and pain; and told me that he had promised never to abuse us in such sort again.
After this he recovered; but I do not remember that from thenceforward he either struck me or my children so as to hurt us, or with that mischievous intent as he before used to do; nor was he so passionate afterwards as he had been accustomed to be. All which I looked upon as the Lord's doing, and marvellous it was in my eyes.
A few weeks after this, my master made another remove; whic was the largest he had ever made, being two days journey, and mostly over the ice. The first day the ice was bare; but some snow falling on the second, it made it very difficult to travel over. I received much hurt by frequent falls: having, besides, the care of my infant, which increased my trouble not a little. It was night when we arrived at our camp; and I was ordered to go and fetch water; but having sat a while on the cold ground, I could neither stand nor go, by reason that my limbs were so benumbed with cold. Yet I dared not refuse; and therefore attempted it by crawling on my hands and knees; but a young Indian squaw, belonging to another family, being come to see our people, she in compassion took the kettle; and knowing where to go, which I did not, fetched the water for me; which I took as a great favour, in that her heart was inclined to do me this service.
I now saw the design of this journey. My master, as I suppose, being weary of keeping us, was willing to make what ransom he could of us; and therefore went farther towards the French settlements, leaving his family at this place; where they had a great dance, several other Indians coming to our people. This held some time; and while they were employed in it, I got out of their way as far as I could into a corner of the wigwam. But every tims they came by me in their dancing, they would bow my head towards the ground, and frequently kick me with great fury. Divers of them were barefooted, and the rest had only mocksans on. The dance lasted some time; and they made, in their manner, great rejoicing and noise.
It was not many days before my master returned from the French; but in such ill humour, that he would not suffer me to abide in his presence. I had a little shelter made with boughs; having first digged through the snow, which was then pretty deep, quite into the ground. In this hole I and my poor children were put to lodge; and as the weather was then very sharp, and the frosts hard (it being then the month called January) our lodging was extremely bad. But our stay was not long in this wretched place, before my master took me and my children to the French, in order to get a chapman (buyer) for us. when we came among them, I was exposed to sale, and the price my master put upon me was 800 livres. But nobody appearing disposed to comply with his demands, and a Frenchman offering no more than 600 livres, it threw him into such a rage, that he said in his passion, if he could not have his price, he would burn me and the babe in the view of the city of Port-Royal. The Frenchman bade him make the fire; and added, "I will help you, if you think that will do you more good than 600 livres;" called him a fool, and roughly bidding him begone: but at the same time he was very civil to me; and for my encouragement bade me be of good cheer, for I should be redeemed, and not go back with the Indian again. I was obliged, however, to reture with my master that night; but the next morning I was redeemed for 600 livres.
In driving the bargain with my master, the Frenchman asked him why he demanded so much for the little babe's ransom? urging, that when it came to have its belly-full it would die. The Indian said, No; it would not die; having already lived twenty-six days on nothing but water; and that he believed it was a devil. The Frenchman said, No; but the child is ordered for longer life; and it hath pleased God to preserve it to admiration. My master answered, No; that was not the case; but it was a devil; and he believed it would not die, unless they took a hatchet, and knocked out its brains.
This ended their discourse; and I was redeemed as aforesaid, with my little babe, for 600 livres. My little boy was likewise redeemed for an additional sum. And by this means we exchanged our lodging and diet for the better, the French being kind and civil to me beyond what I could expect or desire. ....[CONTINUED IN _MARRIAGE NOTES_ FOR ELIZABETH MEADER AND JOHN HANSON]



Marriage Notes for John Hanson and Elizabeth Meader:

CONTINUED FROM ELIZABETH MEADER'S NOTES...

The day after I was redeemed, a Romish priest took my babe from me; and according to their custom they baptized it; urging that if it died before, it would be damned; and accordingly they gave it the name of Mary Ann Trossways; telling it, that if it died then, it would be saved, being baptized. And my landlord also, speaking to the priest who performed the ceremony, said, it would be well if Trosswaus were to die then, being in a state of salvation. But the priest replied, that the child having been miraculously preserved through so many hardships, it might be designed for some great work, and, by its life being continued, might glorify God much more than if it were to die then. A very seasonable remark; and I wish it may prove true.

I had then been about five months among the Indians, and one month with the French, when my dear husband, to my unspeakable joy and comfort, came to me. He was much concerned for the redemption of his children; two of our daughters, and the servant-maid, being still inthe hands of the Indians; and only myself and the two little-ones redeemed.

Accordinglt, after much difficulty and trouble, he recoverd our younger daughter and the maid; but we could by no means obtain our eldest from them. For the squaw to whom she was given had a son; and she intended a match between my daughter and him, hoping in time to prevail upon her to comply: for the Indians are seldom guilty of any indecent carriage towards their captive women, unless much overtaken in liquor. The affection they had for my daughter made them refuse all offers and terms of ransom. So that after my husband had waited, and used his utmost endeavours to obtain our child, we were at last obliged to depart homewards, and leave our daughter, to our great grief, amongst the Indians.

We accordingly set forward over the lake, with three of our children and servant, in company with sundry other; and, by the kindness of Providence, got well home on the 1st of the Seventh Month, called September, in the year 1725. From which it appears that I had been from home amongst the Indians and French, and on my journey, twelve months and six days. In which series of time, the many deliverances and wonderful providences of God to us, have been, and I hope will remain to be, a continued obligation ever to live in fear, love, and obedience to God Almighty; hoping, by the assistance of his grace, with meekness and wisdom to approve myself in holiness of life, and godliness of conversation, to the praise of him who has called me; who is God, blessed for ever.

But my dear husband could not enjoy himself with satisfaction, because of the absence of our dear daughter Sarah, who, as I said before, was left behind. For which reason, not being willing to omit any thing which lay in his power for procuring her redemption, he concluded to make a second attempt. In order to this he began his journey about the 19th of the Second Month (April) 1727, in company with a kinsman and his wife, who went to redeem some of their children, and were successful enough to obtain their desire. But my dear husband was taken sick by the way, and grew worse and worse. And as he was very sensible he should not get over it, he told my kinsman, that if it were the Lord's will he should die in the wilderness, he was freely given up to it. And at length, under a good composure of mind, and sensible to his last moments, he died, as near as they could guess, at the distance of about helfway between Albany and Canada, in my kinsman's arms; and is, I doubt not, at rest in the Lord. And although mine and my chidrens loss is very great, yet his gain I hope is much greater. I therefore desire and pray that the Lord will enable me patiently to submit to his will in all things - earnestly beseeching the God and Father of all our mercies to be a father to my fatherless children, and give them that blessing which makes truly rich, and adds no sorrow with it; that as they grow in years, they may grow in grace, and experience the joy of his salvation, which is come by Jesus Christ, our Lord and Saviour. Amen.

After the death of my dear husband, my kinsman proceeded on his journey; and when he arrived at Canada, he used all possible means to obtain my daughter's freedom, but all his endeavours proved ineffectual; she being still in the hands of the same old squaw, who designed at any rate to oblige my daughter to marry her son, and for that reason utterly rejected any proposal for her redemption. But herein she missed of her aim; for whilst she was endeavouring to bring my daughter to consent, a Frenchman (Jean-Baptiste Sabourin), who had taken a great liking to her, interposed. He spared no pains by persuasion to gain her conseng; setting before her the immediate privilege she would obtain by becoming his wife, to wit, her freedom from captivity among the Indians; for in such a case it seems they have no pretence to detain their captives any longer after marrying a Frenchman; but the woman then becomes the sole property of her husband. These remonstrances and persuasions, added to the improbability of her being redeemed from the Indians by any other means, at last prevailed; and accordingly she was married to the Frenchman, and settled amongst that people.

Thus, as well as I was able by the help of memory (not having been in a condition to keep a journal) I have given a short but true account of some of the remarkable trials, and wonderful deliverances that have befallen me and mine. Which I never intended to publish, but that I hoped the merciful kindness and goodness of God might thereby be manifested; and the reader stirred up with more care and fear to righteousness and humility; and then will my purpose be answered.

N.B. The substance of the foregoing account was taken from her own mouth by Samual Bownas. And in the Seventh Month, called September, 1741, Samuel Hopwood was with her, and received the relation much to the same purpose; at which time he saw the chid (then agrown a young woman) who was sucking at her breast when she was carried into captivity.

Finis
 
Source: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/n/e/Jennifer-M-Sneirson/GENE13-0029.html    15 janvier 2011

 

 

Josiah Ignace Rising dit Raizenne #6983 et Abigail Élizabeth Nims dit Nimbs #6984
Copie du site de Les Sabourin d'Amérique le 15 janvier 2011
REFN4216
Baptized as; Marie Elizabeth Nims. Given name at Roman Catholic baptism
in Quebec of: Mary Elizabeth. Her Birth Name was Abigail Nims.
The following information was taken by Jennifer Sneirson from the web
address;
http ://ftp.cosmos.org/HTML/d0003/g0000094.html#l15945
She was the youngest daughter of Godfrey Nims and his second wife, Mahitable Smead Hull, widow of Jeremia Hull. She was captured during the Deerfield massacre of 1704 and carried to Quebec. She married at Sault-au-Recollet, Quebec, another captive, Josiah Rising on July 19th or 29th, 1715. Josiah Rising was born Feb 2, 1694 at Suffield, Connecticut, and died Dec 30, 1771 at Lac Des Deux Montagnes, Quebec. He was buried in the Chapel de Rois at L'Annonciation Church, Oka, Quebec. Both Abigail and Josiah were captured and carried to Quebec after the Deerfield Massacre of Feb. 29, 1704. Abigail was taken with her mother, half-brother Ebenezor, step-sister, Elizabeth Hull and her brother-in-law, Philip Mattoon to Quebec on a forced march. Her mother and Philip Mattoon died along the way. Josiah Rising was staying with his father's cousin, Mehuman Hinsdale , at the time of the massacre and was captured as well. The squaw, Ganastarsi, probably the wife or mother of Abigail's captor, took in Abigail on her arrival at the fort at Sault-au-Recollet. She was given the name Towatogawach , meaning "she withdraws from the water." Josiah was taken by his captor, Macqua. He was given the name "Shoetakwanni, meaning "he was taken away from his village." Both were baptized in the Roman Catholic religion by missionaries at Sault-au-Recollet shortly after their arrival. The following is a transcript of the French record of baptism of Abigail Nims: "On the 15th day of June in the year 1704, the rites of baptism have been administered by me, the undersigned, to a little English girl named in her country, Abigail, and now Mary Elizabeth, born at Deerfield in New England the 31st of May of the year 1700, of the marriage of Geoffry Nimbs sic), cordwainer, and Meetable Smeed (sic), also deceased. signed, Marie Elizabeth Longeuil Meriel, Priest. "also known as Abigail Nims. Also known by her indian Name; Abigail dit Touatogouach, But she was baptised as Mary Elizabeth Nims. Also known as Abigail Nims. Also known as Elizabeth Stebenne according to Hilaire Fortier. Also known as Elisabeth Stebben, as per Karole Dumont. Christened 15 June 1704 in Montreal, Quebec. Aka Marie Elizabeth Naim. Also stated as date of birth as July 11, 1700 by Ellen Picard. Abigail Elizabeth Nims was a "Deerfield Captive" with her father Godfrey. On the way to Quebec, her father died and she was "adopted" by John Stebbins. She later became known as Marie Elizabeth Stebenne, and as M.E. Stebins. John Stebbins wife was Dorothee Alexander.

Jean-Baptiste Sabourin, a Captain in the French Militia, and son of Pierre Sabourin and Madeleine Perrier, married Sara Enneson (the French connotation of the name Sarah Hanson), on 29 July 1727 at Lac-des-Deux-Montagnes. Sarah was 17 years old and Jean-Baptiste was 26. From this union, there were eight children. The irony of fate in this story of the saga of the captivity of Sarah Hanson is that two of her children eventually married two of the Raizenne family members. The Raizenne (a French connotation of the family name of Rising) were the children of Ignace Raizenne [Rising] and of Elizabeth Nimbs (Abigail Elizabeth Nims) of the Deerfield, Massachusetts Rising and Nims families. Ignace (Josiah) Rising and Elizabeth (Abigail) Nims had both been taken captive by the indians and carried off to Canada. Both had been given indian names - Ignace was called Shoentakouani, and Elizabeth had the name Toutogouach. The records show that she was baptized on 15 June 1704 at Montreal and that her Godmother was the illustrious Elizabeth Lemoyne of Longueil (near Montreal). During her captivity, Elizabeth lived in an Indian tepee ("cabane indienne") with an old Indian woman named "Gonastarsi." Ignace (Rising) Raizenne and Elizabeth Nims were married 29 July 1715*** at Notre Dame de Lorette (Oka, P.Q.)

*For records of this Baptism & Marriage, write to Nat'l Archives in Montreal, P.Q. **Kigileke8e - see page 124 of "A Travers les registres" by Cyprien Tanguay ***See page 963 of "Dictionnaire Genealogique" by Rene Jette.
 
Source: http://www.famille-sabourin.net/getperson.php?personID=I27175&tree=MM1 15 janvier 2011

 

John Hanson Ennson #6965 et Elisabeth Meadar Midar #6966
Copie du site de  Caren Secord en 2010
Elizabeth Hanson's story was given to me by Bob Gunn, a Hanson descendant. The information on Elizabeth Hanson's children and on her connection to John Hanson, early settler in Charlotte County, comes from other Hanson researchers. The source is not known to me and I have not attempted to confirm it.

John and Elizabeth Hanson were living in Dover, New Hampshire at the time that this story took place. In this version, Elizabeth states that she was captured on June 27, 1724. See http://www.canadiana.org/cgi-bin/ECO/mtq?doc=45560 for another online version, which gives the date as August 27, 1725. This fits with the date of birth of Mercy as given below.

Here is the list of children of John and Elizabeth Hanson that I was given:

1) Hannah - born Jun. 11, 1705
2) Sarah - born Nov. 13, 1707
3) Elizabeth - born Nov. 13, 1709/10
4) John - born Mar. 17, 1713
5) Isaac - born Feb. 25, 1714
6) Daniel - born Mar. 26, 1718
7) Ebenezer - born Feb. 27, 1720
8) Caleb - born Feb. 8, 1721
9) Mercy - born Aug. 13, 1724
10) Abigail - born 1727, after her father's death

Ebenezer and Caleb were the two sons who were killed immediately. The elder Elizabeth, plus her daughters Sarah, Elizabeth and Mercy, her son Daniel, and a maidservant were captured. The elder Elizabeth, Mercy, and Daniel were eventually taken to the French in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, where John was able to ransom them. First, though, the baby Mercy was baptized by the French there. The name given in the story is Mary Ann Frossway - possibly Marie Anne Francoise? We aren't told where the daughter Elizabeth was taken but she was ransomed as well.

Sarah was taken to what is now Quebec, and her father was unable to secure her release. She married Jean Baptiste Sabourin there on July 27, 1727. Rene Jette's Dictionnaire genealogique des familles du Quebec indicates that she was baptized in the Catholic Church at Oka on July 21, 1727, and was given the name Catherine at that time. Her marriage record gives her name as Sara Ennson, the daughter of Jean and Elisabeth (Midar) Ennson. Sarah and Jean Baptiste Sabourin had a number of children, two of whom married Raizennes. Their father was listed in the French records as Ignace Raizenne, but he was really Josiah Rising, and he and his wife Abigail Nims were both captives from New England as well. For an account of the experiences of Josiah and Abigail (and numerous others, though not Sarah), see True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars, by C. Alice Baker. This book was originally published in 1897 and was reissued in 1990 by Heritage Books, Maryland. Teena Parlee, a descendant of Sarah, has pointed out to me that the Jean Baptiste Sabourin/Sarah Hanson house in Hudson, Quebec still exists, and is now known as the Greenwood Centre. See http://hudson-village.info/greenwood/page5.html for more information.

Isaac, the second son of John and Elizabeth (Meader) Hanson, had a son named John who was born in 1739. He was an early settler in Charlotte County, New Brunswick. See also the "Glimpses of the Past" article LXXVIII - ST. ANDREWS, for more on John Hanson. One of John's sons, William, married Dorcas Milliken.
 
Source:  http://members.shaw.ca/caren.secord/locations/NewBrunswick/Hanson/Elizabeth(Meader)Hanson_background.html en 2010

 

 

 

John Hanson Ennson #6965 et Elisabeth Meadar Midar #6966
Copie du site de  Caren Secord en 2010
The Remarkable Captivity and Surprising Deliverance of Elizabeth Hanson

Wife of John Hanson, of Knoxmarsh at Kecheachy, in Dover Township, who was taken captive with her children and maidservant, by the Indians in New England, in the year 1721 (sic) in which are inserted sundry remarkable preservations, providences, and marks the care and kindness of Providence over her and her children, worthy to be remembered, the substance of which was taken from her own mouth.

Dover –

Re-printed from a copy of the fourth edition, 1824.

God’s Mercy Surmounting Man’s Cruelty

Remarkable and many are the providences of God towards his people for their deliverance in a time of trouble, by which we may behold, as in lively characters, the truth of that saying, “That he is a God near at hand, and always ready to help and assist those that fear him and put their complete confidence in him.”

The sacred writings give us instances of the truth hereof in days of old, as in the cases of the Israelites, Job, David, Daniel, Paul, Silas, and many others. Besides which, our modern histories have plentifully abounded with instances of God’s Fatherly care over his people, in their sharpest trials, deepest distresses and sorest exercises, by which we may know he is a God that changeth not, but is the same yesterday, today and forever.

Among the many modern instances, I think I have not met with a more singular one of the mercy and preserving hand of God, than the case of Elizabeth Hanson, wife of John Hanson, of Knoxmarsh, Kecheachy, in Dover Township, in New England, who was taken into captivity the twenty-seventh day of the sixth month, called June, 1724, and carried away (with four children and a servant) by the Indians, which relation as it was taken from her own mouth, is as follows:

Captivity and Redemption of Elizabeth Hanson, of Dover

As soon as the Indians discovered themselves (having, as we later understood, been skulking in the fields some days watching their opportunity when my dear husband, with the rest of our men, were gone out of the way) two of them came in upon us, and then eleven more, all naked, with their guns and tomahawks, and in a great fury killed one child immediately as soon as they entered the door, thinking thereby to strike in us the greatest terror, and to make us fearful of them. After which, in like fury, the captain came up to me, but at my request he gave me quarter. There was with me our servant, and six of our children, two of the little ones being at play about the orchard, and my youngest child but fourteen days old, in cradle or arms I now remember not. Being in this condition, I was very unfit for the hardships I soon met with, which I shall endeavour briefly to relate.

They went to rifling the house in a great hurry (fearing, I suppose, a surprise from our people, it being late in the afternoon) and packed up some linen, woolen and what other articles pleased them best, and when they had done what they would, they turned out of the house immediately, and while they were at the door two of my younger children, one six and the other four years old, came in sight, and being under a great surprise, cried aloud, upon which one of the Indians running to them, took them under his arms, and brought them to us. My maid prevailed with the biggest to be quiet and still, but the other could by no means be prevailed with, but continued shrieking and crying very much, and the Indians, to ease themselves of the noise, and to prevent the danger of discovery that might arise from it, before my face, immediately, knocked his brains out. I bore this as well as I could, not daring to appear disturbed, or show much uneasiness, lest they should do the same to the other. I should have been exceedingly glad if they had kept out of sight until we had gone from the house.

Now, having killed two of my children, they scalped them (a practice common with those people, which is, whenever they kill any enemies, they cut the skin off from the crown of their heads, and carry it with them for a testimony and evidence that they have killed so many, receiving, sometimes, a reward for each scalp) and then put forward to leave the house in great haste, without doing any other spoil than taking what they packed together, myself and little babe, 14 days old, the boy 6 years and two daughters, the one 14 and the other 16 years, with my servant girl.

It must be considered that I having lain-in but 14 days, and being but very tender and weakly, and removed now out of a good room, well accommodated with fire, bedding and other things suiting one in my condition, it made these hardships to me greater than if I had been in a strong and healthy frame, yet, for all this, I must go or die. There was no resistance.

In this condition aforesaid, we left the house, each Indian having something; and I with my babe and three children that could go of themselves. The Captain, though he had as great a load as he could well carry and was helped up with it, did for all that, carry my babe for me in his arms, which I took to be a favour from him. Thus we went on through several swamps, and some brooks, they carefully avoiding all paths or any track like a road, lest by our footsteps we be followed.

We got that night, I suppose, not quite ten miles from our house, on a direct line; then taking up their quarters, lighted a fire, some of them lying down, while the others kept watch. I, wet and weary, lying on the cold ground in the open woods, got but little rest.

However, early in the morning, we must go just as the day appeared, travelling very hard all that day through sundry rivers, brooks and swamps, just as before carefully avoiding paths, for the reasons already explained. At night I was both wet and tired exceedingly, having the same lodging on the cold ground, in the open woods. Thus, for twenty-six days, day by day, we traveled very hard, sometimes a little by water, over lakes and ponds, and in this journey we went up some high mountains, so steep that I was forced to creep upon my hands and knees, under which difficulty, the Indian, my master, would carry my babe for me, which I took as a great favour of God that his heart was so tenderly inclined to assist me, though he had, as it is said, a very heavy burden of his own; nay, he would sometimes take my very blanket, so that I had nothing to do but to take my little boy by the hand for his help, and assist him as well as I could, taking him up in my arms at times, because so small; and when we came to very bad places, he would lend me his hand, or coming behind, would push me before him, in all which he showed some humanity and civility, more than I could have expected; for which privilege I was secretly thankful to God, as the moving cause thereof.

Next to this, we had some great runs of water and brooks to wade through, in which, at times, we met with much difficulty, wading often to our middles, and sometimes our girls were up to their shoulders and chins, the Indians carrying my boy on their shoulders. At the side of one of these runs or rivers the Indians would have my eldest daughter, Sarah, to sing them a song. Then was brought to her remembrance that passage in the 137th Psalm, “By the Rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept when we remembered Zion; we hanged our harps on the willows in the midst thereof; for they that carried us away captive, required of us a son, and they that wasted us required of us mirth.” When my poor child had given me this account, it was very affecting, and my heart was very full of trouble, yet, on my child’s account, I was glad that she had so good an inclination, which she yet further manifested in longing for a Bible, that we might have the comfort of reading the holy text at vacant times, for our spiritual comfort under our present affliction.

Next to the difficulties of the rivers were the prodigious swamps and thickets, very difficult to pass through, in which places my master would sometimes lead me by the hand, a great way together, and give me what help he was capable of under the straits we went through; and we passing one after another, the first made it pretty passable for the hindmost.

But the greatest difficulty that deserves the first to be named, was want of food, having at times nothing to eat but pieces of old beaver-skin match-coats, which the Indians having hid (for they came naked as is said before) which, in their going back, they took with them, and they were used more for food than for raiment, being cut into long narrow straps, they gave us little pieces, which, by the Indians’ example we laid on the fire until the hair was singed away, and then we ate them as a sweet morsel, experimentally knowing “that to the hungry soul every bitter thing is sweet”.

It is to be considered further that of this poor diet we had very scanty allowance; so that we were in no danger of being over charged. That which added to my trouble, was the complaints of my poor children, especially the little boy. Sometimes the Indians would catch a squirrel, or a beaver, and other times we met with nuts, berries and roots they dug out of the ground, with the bark of some trees; but we had no corn for a great while together, though some of the younger Indians went back and brought some corn from the English inhabitants (the harvest not being gathered) of which we had a little allowed us; but when they caught a beaver, we lived high while it lasted, they allowed me the guts and garbage for myself and the children but not allowing us to clean and wash them as they ought, made the food very irksome to us to feed upon, and nothing besides pinching hunger could have it any way tolerable to be borne.

The next difficulty was no less hard to me; for my daily travel and hard living made my milk dry almost quite up, and how to preserve my poor babe's life was no small care on my mind; having no other sustenance for her many times but cold water, which I took in my mouth and let it fall on my breast; and when I gave her the teat to suck, with what it could get from the breast, and when I had any of the broth of the beaver's guts or other guts, I fed my babe with it, and as well as I could I preserved her life until I got to Canada, and then I had some other food, of which more in its place.

Having by this time got considerably on the way, the Indians parted; and we were divided amongst them. This was a sore grief to us all; but we must submit and no way to help ourselves. My eldest daughter was first taken away and carried to another part of the country, far distant from us, where, for the present, we must take our leave of her, though with a heavy heart.

We did not travel far after this, before they divided again, taking my second daughter and servant maid from me. So I, having now only the babe at my breast, and a little boy six years old, we remained with the captain still. My daughter and servant underwent great hardships after they parted from me, travelling three days without any food, no support but cold water; and the third day, what with the cold, the wet and the hunger, the servant fell down as dead in a swoon, being both very cold and wet, at which the Indians with whom they were, were surprised showing some sign of tenderness, being unwilling then to lose them by death, having got them so near home, hoping, if they lived, by their ransoms to make considerable profit of them.

In a few days after this they got ---- their journey's end, where they had more plenty of corn and other food; but flesh often fell very short, having no other way to depend on for it but hunting. When that failed, they had very short commons. It was not long ere my daughter and my servant were likewise parted; and my daughter's master being sick, was not able to hunt for flesh; neither had they any corn in that place, but were forced to eat bark of trees for a whole week.

Being almost famished, in this district, Providence so ordered that some other Indians, hearing of their misery and want came to visit them; (these people being very kind and helpful to one another, which is very commendable) and brought unto them the guts and liver of a beaver, which afforded them a good repast, being but four in number, the Indian, his wife and daughter, and my daughter.

By this time my master and our company got to our journey's end, where we were better fed at times, having some corn and venison, and wild fowl, or what they could catch by hunting in the woods. My master having a large family, fifteen in number, we had at times very short commons, more especially when game was scarce.

But here our lodging was still on the cold ground, in a poor wigwam (which is a kind of a little shelter made with the rind of trees and mats for a covering, something like a tent). These are so easily set up and taken down, that they often remove them from one place to another. Our shoes and stockings and our other clothes being worn out in this long journey through the bushes and swamps, and the weather coming in very hard, we were poorly defended from the cold, for want of necessaries; which caused one of my feet, one of the little babe's, and both of the little boy's to freeze; and this was no small exercise, yet, through mercy, we all did well.

Now, though we got to our journey's end, we were never long in one place, but very often removed from one place to another, carrying our wigwams with us, which we could do without much difficulty. This being for the convenience of hunting, made our accommodation much more unpleasant than if we had continued in one place, by reason of the coldness and dampness of the ground, where our wigwams were pitched made it very unwholesome and unpleasant lodging.

Having now got to the Indian fort, many of the Indians came to visit us, and in their way welcomed my master home, and held a great rejoicing, with dancing, firing of guns, beating on hollow trees, instead of drums, shouting, drinking and feasting after their manner, in such excess for several days together, which I suppose, in their thoughts was a kind of thanks to God put up for their safe return and good success. But while they were in their jollity and mirth, my mind was greatly exercised towards the Lord, that I, with my dear children separated from me, might be preserved from repining against God, under our affliction on one hand, and on the other, we might have our dependence on Him who rules the hearts of men, and can do what he pleases in the kingdoms of the earth, knowing that his care is over them who put their trust in him; but I found it very had to keep my mind as I ought, in the resignation which it is proper it should be in, under such sore trials and afflictions, as at that time I suffered in being under various fears and doubts concerning my children, separated from me, which helped to add to and greatly increase my troubles. Here may I truly say, my afflictions are not to be set forth in words to the extent of them.

We had not been long at home ere my master went a hunting, and was absent about a week, he ordering me, in his absence, to get wood, gather nuts, & etc. I was very diligent, cutting the wood, putting it in order, not having very far to carry it, but when he returned, having got no prey, he was very much out of humor, and the disappointment was so great that he could not forbear revenging it on us poor captives. However he allowed me a little boiled corn for myself and child, but with a very angry look threw a stick or corn-cob at me with such violence ------ our eating. At this his squaw and daughter broke out in a great crying. This made me fear that mischief was hatching against us; and on it, I immediately went out of his presence into another wigwam; upon which he came after me, and in great fury tore the blanket off my back, and took my little boy from me and struck him down as he went along before him; but the poor child, not being hurt, only frightened in the fall, started up and ran away, without crying; then the Indian, my master, left me; but his wife's mother came and sat by me, and told me I must sleep there that night. She then going from me a little time, came back with a small skin to cover my feet withal, informing me that my master now intended to kill us; and I, being desirous to know the reason, expostulated, that in his absence I had been very diligent to do as I was ordered by him. Thus, as well as I could, I made her sensible how unreasonable he was. Now, though she could not understand me, nor I her, but by signs, we reasoned as well as we could. She, therefore, made signs that I must die, advising me, by pointing up with her fingers in her way, to pray to God, endeavoring by her signs and tears to instruct me in that which was most needful, viz. to prepare for death, which now threatened me; the poor old squaw was so very kind and tender that she would not leave me all the night, but laid herself down at my feet, designing what she could to assuage her son-in-law's wrath, who had conceived evil against me, chiefly, as I understood, because the want of victuals urged him to it. My rest was little that night, my poor babe sleeping sweetly by me.

I dreaded the tragic design of my master, looking every hour for his coming to execute his bloody will upon us; but he, being weary with hunting, and travel in the woods, having toiled for nothing, went to rest and forgot it. Next morning he applied himself again to hunting in the woods, but I dreaded his returning empty, and prayed secretly in my heart, that he might catch some food to satisfy his hunger and cool his ill humor. He had not been gone but a little time until he returned with booty, having shot some wild ducks ---- better temper, ordered the fowls to be dressed with speed; for these kind of people, when they have plenty, spend it as freely as they get it; using with gluttony and drunkenness in two days time as much as, with prudent management, might serve a week. Thus do they live for the most part, either in excess of gluttony and drunkenness, or under great straits of want of necessaries. However, in this plentiful time I felt the comfort of it in part with the family, having a portion sent for me and my little ones, which was very acceptable. Now, I was thinking the bitterness of death was over for this time, my spirits were a little easier.

Not long after this, he got into the like ill humour again, threatening to take my life. But I always observed whenever he was in such a temper, he wanted food and was pinched with hunger. But when he had success in hunting, to take either bears, beavers, bucks or fowls, on which he could fill his belly, he was better humored, though he was naturally of a very hot and passionate nature, throwing sticks, stones or whatever lay in his way, on very slight occasion. This made me in continual danger of my life but God, whose Providence is over all his works, so preserved me that I never received any damage from him that was of any great consequence to me; for which I ever desire to be thankful to my Maker.

When flesh was scarce we had only the guts and garbage allowed to our part; and not being permitted to cleanse the guts any otherwise than emptying the dung, without so much as washing them, as before is noted, in that filthy pickle we must boil them, and eat them, which was very unpleasant. Hunger made up that difficulty, so that this food which was very often our lot, became pretty tolerable to a sharp appetite, which otherwise could not have been dispensed with. Thus I considered, none knows what they can undergo, until they are tried; for what I thought in my own family not fit for food, would here have been a dainty dish and sweet morsel.

By this time, what with fatigue of spirits, hard labor, mean diet and often want of natural rest, I was brought so low that my milk was dried up, my babe very poor and weak, just skin and bones; for I could perceive all her joints from one end of the back to the other; and how to get what would suit her weak appetite I was at a loss; on which one of the Indian squaws, perceiving my uneasiness about my child, began some discourse with me in which she advised me to take the kernels of walnuts, clean them and beat them with a little water, which I did, and when I had so done, the water looked like milk; then she advised me to add to this water a little of the finest Indian corn meal, and boil it a little together; I did so and it became palatable, and was very nourishing to the babe, so that she began to thrive and looked well; which was before more like to die than to live. I found that with this kind of diet, the Indians did often nourish their infants. This was no small comfort to me, but this comfort was soon mixed with bitterness and trouble which thus happened; my master taking notice of my babe's thriving condition, would often look upon her and say, when she was fat enough she would be killed, and he would eat her; and pursuant to his pretence, at a certain time, he made me fetch him a stick that he had prepared for a spit to roast the child upon, as he said, which, when I had done, he made me sit down by him, and undress the infant. When the child was naked, he felt her arms, legs and thighs, and told me she was not fat enough yet, I must dress her again until she was better in case.

Now, though he thus acted, I could not persuade myself that he intended to do as he pretended; but only to aggravate and afflict me; nether could I ever think but our lives would be preserved from his barbarous hands, by the over-ruling power of Him in whose Providence I put my trust.

A little time after this my master fell sick, and in his sickness, as he lay in his wigwam, he ordered his own son to beat my son; but the old squaw, the Indian boy's grandmother, would not suffer him to do it; then his father, being provoked, caught up a stick, very sharp at one end, and with great violence threw it from him, at my son, and hit him --- which my child was much bruised, and the pain, with the surprise made him turn as pale as death, I entreating him not to cry, and the boy, but six years old, bore it with wonderful patience, not so much as in the least complaining, so that the child's patience assuaged the barbarity of his heart; who, no doubt, would have carried his passion and resentment much higher, had the child cried, as always complaining did aggravate his passion, and his anger grew hotter upon it. Some little time after, on the same day, he got upon his feet but far from being well. However, though he was sick, his wife and daughter let me know, he intended to kill me, and I was under a fear, unless Providence interposed, how it would end. I, therefore, put down my child and, going out of his presence, went to cut wood for the fire as I used to do, hoping that would, in part, alley his passion; but, withal, ere I came to the wigwam again I expected my child would be killed in this mad fit, having no other way but to cast my care upon God, who had hitherto helped and cared for me and mine.

Under this great feud, the old squaw, my master's mother-in-law, left him; but my mistress and her daughter abode in the wigwam with my master; and when I came in with my wood, the daughter came to me, whom I asked if her father had killed my children, and she made me a sign no, with a countenance that seemed pleased it was so; for instead of further venturing his passion on me and my children, the Lord, in whom I trusted did seasonably interpose, and I took it as a merciful deliverance from him, and the Indian was under some sense of the same, as he, himself, did confess to them about him afterwards.

Thus it was, a little after he got upon his feet, the Lord struck him with great sickness and a violent pain, as appeared by the complaint he made in a doleful and hideous manner; which, when I understood, not yet having seen him, I went to another squaw, that was come to see my master, who could both speak and understand English, and enquired of her if my mistress (for so I always called her, and him master) thought that master would die? She answered, Yes, it was very likely he would, being worse and worse. Then I told her he struck my boy with a dreadful blow without any provocation at all, and had threatened to kill us all in his fury and passion; upon which the squaw told me my master had confessed the above abuse he offered my child, and that the mischief he had done, was the cause why God afflicted him with that sickness and pain, and he had promised never to abuse us in such sort more; and after this he soon recovered, but was not so passionate; nor do I remember he ever after struck me or children, so as to hurt us, or with that mischievous intent as he used to do. This I took as the Lord's doing, and it was marvellous in my eyes.

Some few weeks after this, my master made another remove, having, as before, made several; but this was the longest he ever made, it being two days journey and mostly upon ice.

The first days journey, the ice was bare, but the next day, some snow falling, made it very troublesome, tedious and difficult travelling and I took much damage in often falling, having the care of my babe, that added not a little to my uneasiness; and the last night, when we came to encamp, it being in the night, I was ordered to fetch water, but, having sat awhile on the cold ground, I could neither go nor stand; but crawling on my hands and knees, a young Indian Squaw came to see our people, being of another family, in compassion took the bottle, and knowing where to go, which I did not, fetched the water for me. This I took as a great favour, that her heart was inclined to do me this service.

I now saw the design of this journey; my master being, as I supposed, weary to keep us, was willing to make what he could of our ransom; therefore he went further towards the French and left his family in this place, where they had a great dance, sundry other Indians coming to our people; this held some time, and while they were in it, I got out of their way in a corner of the wigwam as well as I could; but every time they came by me in their dancing, they would bow my head towards the ground and frequently kick me with a great fury ------ being sundry of them barefoot, and others having Indian moccasins. This dance held some time, and they made (in their manner) great rejoicing and noise.

It was not many days ere my master returned from the French; but was in such a humor when he came back, he would not suffer me in his presence. Therefore I had a little shelter made with some boughs, they having digged through the snow to the ground, the snow being pretty deep. In this hole, I and my poor children were put to lodge, the weather being very sharp, with hard frost, in the month called January, made it more tedious to me and my children. Our stay was not long in this place, before he took me to the French, in order for a chapman; and when we came among them, I was exposed for sale, and he asked for me eight hundred livres. But this chapman not complying with his demand, put him in a great rage, offering him but six hundred, he said in a great passion, if he could not have his demand, he would make a great fire and burn me and the babe in view of the town, which was named Port Royal. The Frenchmen bid the Indian build his fire, and I will, says he, help you, if you think that will do you more good than six hundred livres, calling my master fool and speaking roughly to him, bid him begone. But at the same time the Frenchman was civil to me; and, for my encouragement, bid me be of good cheer, for I should be redeemed, and not go back with them again.

Retiring now with my master for the night, the next day I was redeemed for six hundred livres; and, in treating with my master, the Frenchman queried; why he asked so much for the child's ransom? Urging when she had her belly full, she would die. My master said, No, she would not die having already lived twenty-six days on nothing but water, believing the child to be a devil. The Frenchman told him, No, the child is ordered for longer life; and it has pleased God to preserve her to admiration. My master said, No, she was a devil, and he believed she would not die, unless they took a hatchet and beat her brains out. Thus ended their discourse, and I was, as aforesaid, with my babe, ransomed for six hundred livres, my little boy, likewise at the same time, for an additional sum of livres was redeemed also.

I now having changed my landlord, my table and diet, as well as my lodging, the French were civil beyond what I could either desire or expect. But the next day after I was redeemed, the Romish priest took my babe from me, and, according to their custom, they baptized her, urging if she died before that, she would be damned, like some of our modern pretended priests, and they gave her a name that pleased them best, which was Mary Ann Frossway, telling me, my child, if she now died would be saved, being baptized; and my landlord, speaking to the priest that baptized her, said, it would be well now Frossway was baptized for her to die, being now in a state to be saved. But the priest said No, the child having been so miraculously preserved through so many hardships she may be designed by God for some great work, and by her life being still continued, may far more please God than if she should die. A very sensible remark - and I wish it may prove true.

I having been about five months amongst the Indians, in about one month I got amongst the French, my dear husband, to my unspeakable joy and comfort, came to me, who now himself concerned to redeem his children, two of our daughters being still captives, and only myself and two little ones being redeemed; and through great difficulty and trouble he recovered the younger daughter. But the eldest we could by no means obtain from their hands, for the squaw to whom she was given, had a son with whom she intended my daughter should in time be prevailed with to marry. The Indians are very civil among their captive women, not offering any incivility by any indecent carriage (unless they be much overdone in liquor) which is commendable in them so far.

However, the affections they had for my daughter made them refuse all offers and terms of ransom; so that after my poor husband had waited and made what attempts and endeavours he could to obtain his child, and all to no purpose, we were forced to make homeward leaving ---- behind us, amongst the Indians, and set forward over the lake with three of our children and the servant-maid, in company of sundry others, and by the kindness of Providence we got well home on the first day of the seventh month, 1725. From which it appears I had been from home, amongst the Indians and French, about twelve months and six days.

In the series of which time, the many deliverances and wonderful Providences of God unto us, and over us, hath been, and I hope will so remain to be as a continued obligation on my mind ever to live in that fear, love and obedience to God, duly regarding, by His grace, with meekness and wisdom, to approve myself by His spirit, in all holiness of life, of godliness of conversation, to the praise of Him that hath called me, who is God blessed forever.

But my dear husband, poor man, could not enjoy myself in quiet with us, for want of his dear daughter Sarah, that was left behind; and not willing to omit anything for her redemption which lay in his power, he could not be easy without making a second attempt, in order to which, he took his journey about the nineteenth day of the second month, 1727, in company with a kinsman and his wife, who went to redeem some of their children, and were so happy as to obtain what they went about. But my dear husband being taken sick on the way, grew worse and worse, as we were informed, and was sensible he should not get over it; telling my kinsman that, if it was the Lord's will he must die in the wilderness, he was freely given up to it. He was under a good composure of mind, and sensible to the last moment, and died as near as we can guess, in about the halfway between Albany and Canada, in my kinsman's arms, and is at rest, I hope in the Lord. And though my own children’s loss is very great, yet I doubt not but his gain is much more; I therefore desire and pray that the Lord will enable me patiently to submit to his will in all things he is pleased to suffer to my lot while here, earnestly supplicating the God and Father of all our mercies to be a Father to my fatherless children, and give unto them that blessing which maketh truly rich, and adds no sorrow to it, that as they grow in years they may grow in grace, and experience the joy of his salvation which is come by Jesus Christ, our Lord and Saviour, Amen.

Now, though my husband died, by reason of which his labour was ended, yet my kinsman prosecuted the thing, and left no stone unturned that he thought or could be advised, was proper to the obtaining of my daughter's freedom; but could by no means prevail, for, as is before said,
(she being in another part of the country, different from where I was) and given to an old squaw, who intended to marry her in time to her son, using what persuading she could to effect her end, sometimes by fair means, and sometimes by severe. In the meantime , a Frenchman interposed and they, by persuasions enticed my child to marry, in order to obtain her freedom, by reason that those captives married by the French, are by that marriage made free among them, the Indians having then no pretence longer to keep them as captives, she then was prevailed upon, for the reasons afore assigned, to marry, and she was accordingly married to a Frenchman.

Thus, as well, and as near as I can from my memory (not being capable of keeping a journal) I have given a short, but a true account of some of the remarkable trials and wonderful deliverances, which I never purposed to expose; but that I hope thereby the merciful kindness and goodness of God may be magnified, and the reader thereof provoked with more care and fear to serve him in righteousness and humility and then my end and purpose will be answered.

E. H.
 
Source :  http://members.shaw.ca/caren.secord/locations/NewBrunswick/Hanson/Elizabeth(Meader)Hanson.html

 

 

 

John Hanson Ennson #6965 et Elisabeth Meadar Midar #6966
Livre du site Early Canadiana Online
J'ai ici une copie du livre An Account of the captivity of Elizabeth Hanson recueillis en septembre 1741 par Samuel Bownas et dont la 2ième édition de 1760 est lisible sur le site de Canadiana.org.
 
Source : Le document original est disponible au http://www.canadiana.org/view/45560/3

 

 

 

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Dernière modification : mardi 14 avril 2015